In Memoriam

 

Robin Williams

July 21, 1951 - August 11, 2014

 

Robin Williams By: Andy Dougan (1998)
(Book) Andy Dougan's biography provides a detailed look at of Robin Williams's life and career from his poor-little-rich-kid childhood to his successes in such films as The Fisher King, Awakenings, and Mrs. Doubtfire. Dougan interviewed Williams five times and spoke with the actor's schoolmates, teachers, colleagues, and costars.

 

 

Good Morning, Vietnam (1988)
Imported by the Army for an early morning radio show in Vietnam, disc jockey Adrian Cronauer blasts the formerly staid, sanitized airwaves with a constant barrage of rapid-fire humor and the hottest hits from back home. The G.I.'s love him, but the brass is up in arms.

 

Dead Poets Society (1989)
Robin Williams portrays English professor John Keating, who, in an age of crew cuts, sport coats and cheerless conformity, inspires his students to live life to the fullest, exclaiming "Carpe Diem, lads! Seize the day. Make your lives extraordinary!" The charismatic teacher's emotionally charged challenge is met by his students with irrepressible enthusiasm--changing their lives forever.

 

 

Awakenings (1990)
A new doctor finds himself with a ward full of catatonic patients. He is disturbed by them and the fact that they have been catatonic for decades with no hope of any cure. When he finds a possible chemical cure he gets permission to try it on one of them. When the first patient awakes, he is now an adult having gone into a catatonic state in his early teens. The film then delights in the new awareness of the patients and then on the reactions of their relatives to the changes in the newly awakened.

 

Mrs. Doubtfire (1993)
Daniel Hillard (Williams) is an eccentric actor who specializes in dubbing voices for cartoon characters. Daniel is a kind man and a loving father, but he's a poor disciplinarian and a shaky role model. After throwing an elaborate and disastrous birthday party for his son, Daniel's wife Miranda (Sally Field) reaches the end of her patience and files for divorce. Daniel is heartbroken when Miranda is given custody of the children, and he's only allowed to visit them once a week. Determined to stay in contact with his kids, Daniel learns that Miranda is looking for a housekeeper, and with help from his brother Frank (Harvey Fierstein), a makeup artist, Daniel gets the job disguised as Mrs. Iphegenia Doubtfire, a stern but caring Scottish nanny. Daniel pulls off the ruse so well that neither his ex-wife nor his children recognize him, and in the process, he learns how to be the good parent he should have been all along.

 

 

Aladdin (1992)
In the heart of an enchanted city, a commoner named Aladdin and his mischievous monkey, Abu, battle to save the free-spirited Princess Jasmine. Aladdin's life changes with one rub of a magic lamp as a fun-loving, shape-shifting Genie appears and grants him three wishes. Through his adventures, Aladdin proves that he is a prince where it truly matter most - on the inside.

 

Jumanji (1995)
When Alan Parrish discovers a mysterious board game, he doesn't realize its unimaginable powers until he is magically transported into the untamed jungles of Jumanji! There he remains for 26 years until he is freed from the game's spell by two unsuspecting children. Now a grown man, Alan tries to outwit the game's powerful forces.

 

 

Good Will Hunting (1997)
After MIT professor Lambeau (Stellan Skarsgard) stumps students with a challenging math formula on a hallway blackboard, Will anonymously leaves the correct solution, prompting Lambeau to track the elusive young genius. As Will's problems with the police escalate, Lambeau offers an out, but with two conditions -- visits to a therapist and weekly math sessions. Will agrees to the latter but refuses to cooperate with a succession of therapists. Lambeau then contacts his former classmate, therapist Sean McGuire (Robin Williams), an instructor at Bunker Hill Community College. Both are equally stubborn, but Will is finally forced to deal with both his past and his future.
 

 

What Dreams May Come (1998)
After Chris Nielsen dies in an accident, he tries to remain close to his mortal wife, Annie. But when his wife takes her own life, she is banished to an eternal damnation. Chris vows to find her so they can share eternity together.

 

 

Hook (1991)
Peter Pan has become Peter Banning (Robin Williams), a 40-year-old mergers and acquisitions lawyer with a permanent scowl on his face and a cellular phone in his belt. Banning has lost any memory of being Peter Pan, and he is also in danger of losing his wife Moira (Caroline Goodall) and two children, Jack (Charlie Korsmo) and Maggie (Amber Scott). Peter and his family travel to London to visit Granny Wendy (Maggie Smith) who recalls Peter's lost youth and asks him, "Peter, dear, don't you know who you are?" With Peter's children asleep in the same bedroom where the original Peter Pan story began, there is a blinding flash. Peter comes into the room to discover a note from Captain Hook (Dustin Hoffman), informing Peter that he has kidnapped his children. Granny Wendy now tells him who he really is and encourages him to re-discover his happy thoughts, transform himself into the Peter Pan of the past, and go rescue his children.

 

The Fisher King (1991)
A deejay who finds himself penniless is plucked from disaster by a homeless history professor, who lives in a fantasy world full of castles, Red Knights and damsels in distress. Together they begin a modern quest for redemption and the Holy Grail.

 

 

The Birdcage (1996)
The story of a middle-aged gay couple's comic encounter with a self-righteously straight and conservative family: Armand and Albert reluctantly accept young Val's intention to marry the daughter of a conservative Senator, but when the fiancee's family comes to visit, the whole household is turned upside down.

 

Night at the Museum (2006)
A newly-hired night watchman at the Museum of Natural History discovers that the exhibits come to life every night after dark and sets out to control the chaos they cause.

 

 

License to Wed (2007)
Newly engaged couple, Ben Murphy and Sadie Jones can't wait to be married and live their life together. The problem is that Sadie's family church, St. Augustine's, is run by Reverend Frank, who won't bless them until they pass his patented, "fool-proof" marriage-prep course. The course consists of outrageous classes, outlandish homework assignments and some outright invasion of privacy. Reverend Frank's rigorous curriculum puts Ben and Sadie's relationship to the test.

 

 

Walter Dean Myers

August 12, 1937 - July 1, 2014

 

Darius & Twig (2013)Two best friends, a writer and a runner, deal with bullies, family issues, social pressures, and their quest for success coming out of Harlem

 

 

All the Right Stuff (2012)
The summer after his absentee father is killed in a random shooting, Paul volunteers at a Harlem soup kitchen where he listens to lessons about "the social contract" from an elderly African American man, and mentors a seventeen-year-old unwed mother who wants to make it to college on a basketball scholarship.

 

Looking for the Easy Life (2011)
Five monkeys go in search of the easy life, but find that "easy ain't always good" and "a little work ain't always bad.

 

We are America: A Tribute from the Heart (2011)
Poems explore the diversity in people, wealth, dreams, and desire that make up the United States and give it the unique character, charm, and beauty revered and respected all over the world.

 

The Cruisers (2010)
Friends Zander, Kambui, LaShonda, and Bobbi, caught in the middle of a mock Civil War at DaVinci Academy, learn the true cost of freedom of speech when they use their alternative newspaper, The Cruiser, to try to make peace.

 

Riot (2009)
In 1863, fifteen-year-old Claire, the daughter of an Irish mother and a black father, faces ugly truths and great danger when Irish immigrants, enraged by the Civil War and a federal draft, lash out against blacks and wealthy "swells" of New York City.

 

Looking Like Me (2009)
Jeremy sets out to discover all of the different "people" that make him who he is, including brother, son, writer, and runner.

 

Dope Sick (2009)
Seeing no way out of his difficult life in Harlem, seventeen-year-old Jeremy "Lil J" Dance flees into a house after a drug deal goes awry and meets a weird man who shows him different turning points in his life when he could have made better choices.

 

Harlem Summer (2007)
In 1920s Harlem, sixteen-year-old Mark Purvis, an aspiring jazz saxophonist, gets a summer job as an errand boy for the publishers of the groundbreaking African American magazine, "The Crisis," but soon finds himself on the enemy list of mobster Dutch Shultz.

 

Street Love (2006)
This story told in free verse is set against a background of street gangs and poverty in Harlem in which seventeen-year-old African American Damien takes a bold step to ensure that he and his new love will not be separated.

 

Autobiography of my Dead Brother (2005)
Jesse pours his heart and soul into his sketchbook to make sense of life in his troubled Harlem neighborhood and the loss of a close friend.

 

Time to Love: Stories from the Old Testament (2003)
A retelling of six stories from the Old Testament, which explore the complexity of love from the perspective of Ruth, Delilah, Reuben, Isaac, Gamiel, and Zillah.

 

I've Seen the Promised Land (2003)
Set against key moments in the civil rights movement, here is the story of the powerful, eloquent spiritual leader and his belief that nonviolence could be used to overcome racial discrimination.

 

Lockdown (2003)
Teenage Reese, serving time at a juvenile detention facility, gets a lesson in making it through hard times from an unlikely friend with a harrowing past.

 

(2003)
A visit to his Harlem neighborhood and the discovery that the girl he loves is using drugs give sixteen-year-old Anthony Witherspoon a new perspective both on his home and on his life at a Connecticut prep school.

 

Monster (1999)
While on trial as an accomplice to a murder, sixteen-year-old Steve Harmon records his experiences in prison and in the courtroom in the form of a film script as he tries to come to terms with the course his life has taken.

 

 

Maya Angelou

April 4, 1928 - May 28, 2014

 

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1997) Sent by their mother to their devout, self-sufficient grandmother in a small Southern town, Maya and her brother, Bailey, endure the ache of abandonment and the prejudice of the local “powhitetrash.” When she journeys at eight to her mother’s side in St. Louis, she is attacked by a man many times her age. Years later, in San Francisco, she learns about love for herself–and has to live with the consequences for a lifetime. The kindness of others, Maya’s own strong spirit, and the ideas of great authors (“I met and fell in love with William Shakespeare”) will allow her to be free instead of imprisoned.

 

 

The Heart of a Woman (1981)
Maya Angelou leaves California with her son, Guy, to move to New York. There she enters the society and world of black artists and writers, reads her work at the Harlem Writers Guild, and begins to take part in the struggle of black Americans for their rightful place in the world. In the meantime, her personal life takes an unexpected turn. She leaves the bail bondsman she was intending to marry after falling in love with a South African freedom fighter, travels with him to London and Cairo, where she discovers new opportunities.

 

Still I Rise (2001)
In this inspiring poem, Maya Angelou celebrates the courage of the human spirit over the harshest of obstacles. An ode to the power that resides in us all to overcome the most difficult circumstances, this poem is truly an inspiration and affirmation of the faith that restores and nourishes the soul. Entwined with the vivid paintings of Diego Rivera, the renowned Mexican artist, Angelou's words paint a portrait of the amazing human spirit, its quiet dignity, and pools of strength and courage.

 

 

A Brave and Startling Truth (1995)
First read by Maya Angelou at the 50th anniversary of the founding of the United Nations, this wise and moving poem will inspire readers with its memorable message of hope for humanity.

 

Even the Stars Look Lonesome (1997)
Maya Angelou talking of the things she cares about most. In her unique, spellbinding way, she re-creates intimate personal experiences and gives us her wisdom on a wide variety of subjects. She tells us how a house can both hurt its occupants and heal them. She talks about Africa. She gives us a profile of Oprah. She enlightens us about age and sexuality. She confesses to the problems fame brings and shares with us the indelible lessons she has learned about rage and violence. And she sings the praises of sensuality.

 

 

Letter to My Daughter (2008)
Dedicated to the daughter she never had but sees all around her, Letter to My Daughter reveals Maya Angelou's path to living well and living a life with meaning. Whether she is recalling such lost friends as Coretta Scott King and Ossie Davis, extolling honesty, decrying vulgarity, explaining why becoming a Christian is a "lifelong endeavor," or simply singing the praises of a meal of red rice--Maya Angelou writes from the heart to millions of women she considers her extended family.

 

My Painted House, My Friendly Chicken and Me (1994)
story about Thandi, a South African Ndebele girl, her mischievous brother, her beloved chicken, and the astonishing mural art produced by the women of her tribe. With never-before-seen photographs of the very private Ndebele women and their paintings, this unique book shows the passing of traditions from parent to child and introduces young readers to a new culture through a new friend.

 

Kofi and his Magic (1996)
A young Ashanti boy invites readers to visit his West African village, famous for fine kente cloth, and to share his "magic" a masterful imagination. Artistic typesetting composition is accompanied by appealing color photos that bring the lyrical text into sharp focus. Kofi is an engaging scamp whose vivid "daydreams" that transport him to other places will speak to children everywhere and present them with a clear vision of his beloved West African world. Kofi's joy in his life is reflected in both text and pictorial content and will be an eye-opener to more materialistic children in technically developed environments.

 

 

Air Force Lt. Col. James C. Warren, Tuskegee Airman

August 16, 1923 - May 17, 2014

 

The Tuskegee Airmen Mutiny at Freeman Field
(1995) A historical coverage of the arrest of 162 Black Army Air Force Officers at Freeman Field Indiana. It depicts the trials, tribulations and the fight for democracy by courageous young black men and describes the segregation and discriminatory practices perpetrated against these men by their white commanders. In 1945, 162 black men demanded lawful entry into the white officers club and were arrested. Their refusal to accept the situation, their arrest and their subsequent court martial, was one of the events that led up to President Harry Truman’s desegregation of the Armed Forces in 1948. Lt Col. Warren was instrumental in the planning of the protest and was in the first group of officers to be arrested.

 

 

Gabriel García Márquez

March 6, 1927 - April 17, 2014

 

Gabriel Garci´a Ma´rquez : a life (2009)
Emeritus professor of modern languages at the University of Pittsburgh and a research fellow in Caribbean studies at London Metropolitan University, Martin spent 15 years crafting this biography.

 

Gabriel Garci´a Ma´rquez : the early years (2010)
This long-awaited biography provides a fascinating and comprehensive picture of Garcia Márquez's life up to the publication of his classic 100 Years of Solitude. Based on nearly a decade of research, this biographical study sheds new light on the life and works of the Nobel Laureate, father of magical realism, and bestselling author in the history of the Spanish language. As Garcia Márquez's impact endures on well into his ninth decade, Stavans's keen insights constitute the definitive re-appraisal of the literary giant's life and corpus.

 

 

One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967)
Tells the story of the rise and fall, birth and death of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendía family. Inventive, amusing, magnetic, sad, and alive with unforgettable men and women -- brimming with truth, compassion, and a lyrical magic that strikes the soul -- this novel is a masterpiece in the art of fiction.

 

The Autumn of the Patriarch (1975)
A tale of a Caribbean tyrant and the corruption of power. From charity to deceit, benevolence to violence, fear of God to extreme cruelty, the dictator of The Autumn of the Patriarch embodies the best and the worst of human nature. Gabriel Garcia Mfrquez, the renowned master of magical realism, vividly portrays the dying tyrant caught in the prison of his own dictator-ship. Employing an innovative, dreamlike style, and overflowing with symbolic descriptions, the novel transports the reader to a world that is at once fanciful and real.

 

 

Love in the Time of Cholera (1985)
In their youth, Florentino Ariza and Fermina Daza fall passionately in love. When Fermina eventually chooses to marry a wealthy, well-born doctor, Florentino is devastated, but he is a romantic. As he rises in his business career he whiles away the years in 622 affairs--yet he reserves his heart for Fermina. Her husband dies at last, and Florentino purposefully attends the funeral. Fifty years, nine months, and four days after he first declared his love for Fermina, he will do so again.

 

Of Love and Other Demons (1995)
The story of a doomed love affair between an unruly copper-haired girl and the bookish priest sent to oversee her exorcism. set in a South American seaport in the colonial era, a time of viceroys and bishops, enlightened men and Inquisitors, saints and lepers and pirates. Sierva Maria, only child of a decaying noble family, has been raised in the slaves' courtyard of her father's cobwebbed mansion while her mother succumbs to fermented honey and cacao on a faraway plantation. On her twelfth birthday the girl is bitten by a rabid dog, and even as the wound is healing she is made to endure therapies indistinguishable from tortures. Believed, finally, to be possessed, she is brought to a convent for observation. Unsettling and indelible, Of Love and Other Demons haunts us with its evocation of an exotic world while it treats, majestically, of the most universal experiences known to woman and man.

 

 

No One Writes to the Colonel: and Other Stories
(1961) audiobook
The stories in this mesmerizing short story collection, written with compassionate realism and wit, depict the disparities of town and village life in South America, of the frightfully poor and outrageously rich, of memories and illusions, and of lost opportunities and present joys. Stories include "No One Writes to the Colonel," "Tuesday Siesta," "One of These Days," There Are No Thieves in This Town," "Balthazar's Marvelous Afternoon," "Montiel's Widow," "One Day after Saturday," "Artificial Roses," and "Big Mama's Funeral."

 

 

News of a Kidnapping (1997)
Chronicles the 1990 kidnappings of ten Colombian men and women - all journalists but one - by the Medellin drug boss Pablo Escobar. The carefully orchestrated abductions were Escobar's attempt to extort from the government its assurance that he, and other narcotics traffickers, would not be extradited to the United States if they were to surrender.

 

Leaf storm, and Other Stories (1972)
Contains Leaf Storm, The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World, A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings, Blacaman the Good, Vendor of Miracles, The Last Voyage of the Ghost Ship, Monologue of Isabel Watching It Rain in Macondo, Nabo

 

Collected novellas (1999)
Renowned as a master of magical realism, Gabriel Garcia Marquez has long delighted readers around the world with his exquisitely crafted prose. Brimming with unforgettable characters and set in exotic locales, his fiction transports readers to a world that is at once fanciful, haunting, and real. Leaf Storm, Gabriel Garcia Marquez's first novella, introduces the mythical village of Macondo, a desolate town beset by torrents of rain, where a man must fulfill a promise made years earlier. No One Writes to the Colonel is a novella of life in a decaying tropical town in Colombia with an unforgettable central character. Chronicle of a Death Foretold is a dark and profound story of three people joined together in a fatal act of violence.

 

 

Harold Ramis

November 21, 1944 - February 24, 2014

 

National Lampoon's Vacation (1983)
Directed--The first film in the Vacation comedy franchise stars Chevy Chase as Clark Griswold, an ad exec who becomes consumed with taking his family cross-country to Wally World, a California amusement park. Less a vacation than a descent into a peculiarly American kind of hell, the Griswolds suffer through an endless series of catastrophes, culminating in a run-in with the law.

 

 

Ghostbusters
(1984)
Acted--The paratroopers of the paranormal face their greatest challenge when a woman discovers that her refrigerator leads directly to the gates of hell! With the whole world watching, it's up to the Ghostbusters to keep Manhattan from becoming a madhouse!

Stealing Home (1988)
Acted--An ex-ballplayer returns home, thinking of the past and of the person who made it special. A long-time friend and mentor draws the loose ends of his past and present lives together.

Groundhog Day (1993)
Directed--Teamed with a relentlessly cheerful producer and a smart-aleck cameraman, TV weatherman Phil Connors is sent to Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania to cover the annual Groundhog Day festivities. But on his way out of town, Phil is caught in a giant blizzard, which he failed to predict, and finds himself stuck in small-town hell. Just when things couldn't get any worse, they do. Phil wakes the next morning to find it's Groundhog Day all over again-- and again-- and again.

 

 

Multiplicity (1996)
Directed--A comedy about a man who clones himself to save his marriage and then almost loses his wife to himself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caddyshack (2000)
Directed--As a young caddy tries to earn a golf scholarship, the "slobs" and the "snobs" compete at the Bushwood Country Club.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bedazzled (2000)
Directed--How far will a man go to win the woman he loves? That's the devilish question behind this satirical romantic comedy. Elliot Richards (Brendan Fraser), a low-level white-collar worker, has fallen in love with his co-worker Allison (Frances O'Connor), who barely knows he exists. Desperate to win her love, sad sack Elliot is approached by the Devil (Elizabeth Hurley), who offers him seven wishes in exchange for his soul. Elliot accepts, but none of his wishes works out quite the way that he had hoped; after transforming himself into a South American tycoon, a champion NBA basketball player, a famous author, the most sensitive man in the world, and even the president of the United States, Elliot discovers that the Devil has added a crucial loophole each time, and for all his troubles, Allison still isn't interested in him.

 

 

The Ice Harvest (2006)
Directed--It's Christmas Eve in icebound Wichita, Kansas, and this year Charlie Arglist just might have something to celebrate. Charlie is an attorney for the sleazy businesses of Wichita, along with his unsavory associate, the steely Vic Cavanaugh, the two have just successfully embezzled $2 million from Kansas City boss Bill Guerrard. But the real prize for Charlie is the stunning Renata, who runs the Sweet Cage strip club. Charlie hopes to slip out of town with Renata. But as daylight fades and an ice storm whirls, everyone from Charlie's drinking buddy Pete Van Heuten to the local police begin to wonder just what exactly is in Charlie's Christmas stocking.

 

Shirley Temple Black

April 23, 1928 - February 10, 2014

 

 

Bright Eyes (1934)
A little girl is forced to live with her mother's employers after she is killed in an accident. An aviator who wants to adopt the little girl gets involved in a custody battle with the employer's uncle.

 

 

 

 

Baby Take a Bow (1934)
A little girl helps her father accused of theft by finding the real crook.

 

 

 

The Little Colonel (1935)
An old-fashioned Southern colonel has disowned his daughter for marrying a Yankee and resists all entreaties for a reconciliation until he succumbs to the charms of his little granddaughter.

 

 

 

 

 

Curly Top (1935)
Two orphaned sisters are adopted by the wealthy trustee of their orphanage. Problems arise when the trustee falls in love with the teenaged sister.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heidi (1937)
When her aunt tires of caring for her, orphan Heidi is taken into the Swiss mountains to live with her gruff grandfather, a hermit who comes to adore her. But the aunt returns to steal Heidi away, selling her to a family whose invalid daughter needs a companion. Bullied by an evil governess, Heidi still charms the entire household and never stops trying to return to her beloved grandfather.

The Little Princess (1939)
Adorable Sara Crewe is treated like a little princess at her boarding school. But when reports of her father's death in the Boer War surface, she is forced into servitude towards other girls. The unflappable youngster steps up to the challenge of her new lot in life, and ultimately wins over the hearts of wealthy neighbors - and even Queen Victoria herself - as she refuses to give up hope that her father will one day return after all.

 

 

Shirley Temple: A Pictorial History of the World's Greatest Child Star
by Dubas, Rita
Shirley Temple was a phenomenon, a child star whose talent and personality earned her a permanent place in Hollywood history. The extraordinary six-year-old entertainer struck a chord with audiences all over the globe. Her career sparked a marketing sensation, spurring the production of anything and everything bearing her image-from dolls to tin whistles-in all corners of the globe, both authorized and unauthorized. Despite the decades-long interest in everything Temple, never before has there been a lavishly illustrated art book examining the phenomenon that was Shirley Temple as a child star in the 1930s.

 

 

Shirley Temple Black: Actor and Diplomat
by Blashfield, Jean F
Examines the life and career of this unique person, who as a child star was known around the world for her signing and dancing and as an adult for her public service.

 

Philip Seymour Hoffman

July 23, 1967 - February 2, 2014

 

A Late Quartet
Follows the lives of four longtime colleagues who play in a celebrated string quartet together. As the group begin their 25th season together, the eldest member discovers he has the beginning stage of Parkinson's disease. Because he can't perform to the best of his abilities, he would like to bow out of the quartet without disbanding it. However, a married couple within the group are on the brink of breaking up, and their rocky period isn't helped by the fact that the fourth member has begun an affair with their college-age daughter.

 

 

Mary and Max
Mary is a lonely eight-year-old in the suburbs of Melbourne. Struggling with questions that no one can answer, she writes to Max, an obese 44-year-old Jewish man with Asperger's Syndrome living in New York City, which starts a friendship that spans 20 years and two continents.

 

Jack Goes Boating
Tells the simple tale of Jack, a shy, fortyish limo driver with a fondness for pot and reggae music -- he likes it because it sounds happy -- who meets Connie for a blind date set up by Connie's co-worker Lucy, who is married to Jack's best friend and fellow limo driver, Clyde. As the young couple tentatively come together, breaking through layers and layers of awkwardness and low self-esteem, Clyde and Lucy's marriage begins to dissolve because of Clyde's inability to get over an incident from their past. All the while, Clyde gives Jack swimming lessons so that he can take Connie on her dream date -- a boating trip on the lake.

 

Doubt
When the principal of a Bronx Catholic High School accuses a popular priest of pedophilia, a young nun caught in between the feuding pair becomes hopelessly swept up in the ensuing controversy. Charismatic priest Father Flynn is doing his best to adapt by revisiting the school's notoriously strict disciplinary practices. Unfortunately Father Flynn's progressive ideas stand in stark contrast to the longstanding beliefs of Sister Aloysius Beauvier, the iron-willed principal, who believes that an oppressive environment of punishment and fear is the only way to keep the student body in line. Suddenly into this tempestuous environment appears young Donald Miller, St. Nicholas' first black student. When hopeful innocent Sister James reluctantly reveals to Sister Beauvier that Father Flynn and Donald have been spending an unusual amount of time together in the church rectory, the unrelentingly righteous headmistress begins a merciless crusade to reveal the beloved clergyman as a lecherous child molester and have him permanently expunged from the school.

 

 

Savages
A pair of siblings are forced to set aside their discomfort with one another for the sake of their father. Wendy Savage is a struggling playwright living in New York City who works a day job to support herself and can't shake the feeling that she's failed as an artist. Wendy isn't especially happy about her love life either, gaining little self-esteem from her on-and-off affair with oversexed, married neighbor Larry. Wendy's anxieties about her writing career are intensified by the success of her brother, Jon, who teaches theater history at a college in Buffalo, NY, and has published a number of books. While Jon's life seems fine on the surface, a case of writer's block has stalled work on his latest project, and he's deeply upset that his girlfriend is soon to leave the United States to return to her native Poland. Wendy and Jon don't get along and prefer not to see one another, but an unfortunate circumstance brings them together -- their father, Lenny Savage. Elderly Lenny has began showing signs of dementia, and shortly after he takes to smearing his feces on the walls of his Arizona home, his ailing long-term girlfriend suddenly dies. Wendy and Jon have little choice but to fly to Arizona and see what can be done for Lenny, but their long-simmering animosity makes it hard for them to deal with the realities of Lenny's condition.

 

 

Schenectady, New York
Caden Cotard is an eccentric playwright who lives with artist Adele Lack and their daughter Olive in Schenectady, upstate New York. Prone to neuroses, misgivings and enormous self-doubt, Caden also begins suffering from accelerated physical deterioration - from blood in his stools to disfigured skin. Upon receiving a prestigious MacArthur grant, Caden decides to use the money to concoct one gigantic play as an analogue of his own life; he builds massive sets amid a New York City warehouse, casts others as his friends, family and acquaintances, and casts others to play the ones he's casting. After Adele whisks Olive off to Europe but demonstrates no sign of returning soon, Caden drifts into a series of relationships with lovers - first with box office employee Hazel, who purchases and moves into a house that is perpetually on fire; then with Tammy, an actress assigned to play Hazel in the theatrical project; and subsequently with others. Unfortunately, the play itself grows so big and unwieldy - and rehearsals go on for so long, taking literally decades - that it becomes unclear if the production itself will ever launch.

 

Capote
In 1959, Truman Capote was a critically acclaimed novelist who had earned a small degree of celebrity for his work when he read a short newspaper item about a multiple murder in a small Kansas town. For some reason, the story fascinated Capote, and he asked William Shawn, his editor at The New Yorker, to let him write a piece about the case. Capote had long believed that in the right hands, a true story could be molded into a tale as compelling as any fiction, and he believed this event, in which the brutal and unimaginable was visited upon a community where it was least expected, could be just the right material. Capote traveled to Kansas with his close friend Harper Lee, herself becoming a major literary figure with the success of To Kill a Mockingbird, and while Capote's effete and mannered personal style stuck out like a sore thumb in Kansas, in time he gained the trust of Alvin Dewey, the Kansas Bureau of Investigation agent investigating the murder of the Clutter family, and with his help Capote's magazine piece grew into a full-length book.

 

 

Before the Devil Knows You're Dead
A thriller concerning two brothers who hatch a plan to rob their parent's jewelry store. When the job goes awry, the entire family is set on a collision course with tragedy. Andy is an overextended broker in desperate need of some cash. His brother, Hank, isn't much better off, so when Andy hatches a plan to rob their parent's modest jewelry store, it seems like a foolproof way to make a quick buck. But Andy's trophy wife, Gina, is secretly sleeping with libidinous younger brother Hank, and when the robbery proves a complete disaster it isn't long before loyalties start to shift. Now Andy and Hank's father, Charles, is determined to make the unidentified robbers pay for their crime. What's a father to do when he discovers that the ones he loves have become his worst enemies?

 

Owning Mahowny
A seemingly ordinary bank employee develops an obsession that could destroy his life and that of those around him in this drama. Dan Mahowny is a quiet, unassuming employee of a bank in Toronto; he lives modestly, drives a used car, and is dating one of the bank's tellers, a sweet but mousy girl named Belinda. What no one knows is that Dan has a secret life -- Dan is a compulsive gambler, and after running up massive debts with his bookie Frank Perlin, he begins making regular visits to Atlantic City in the United States, where he often bets (and loses) far beyond his means. Dan's expertise at the bank is rewarded with a promotion to assistant manager; his new responsibilities include approving loans, which gives him the authority to transfer funds in and out of the bank. Needing to cover his debts, Dan starts approving loans to non-existent clients and adding hundreds of thousands of dollars to other accounts. As Dan's debts begin to grow into the seven figure range, his dealings become harder to hide, both from the authorities and from Belinda, who has become aware of Dan's addiction to gambling but doesn't know just how far it's grown.

 

 

Love Liza
A psychological drama about a man trying to come to terms with his wife's suicide. Wilson Joel is searching for answers as to why his wife, Liza, killed herself. He is unable to bring himself to read the suicide note Liza left behind. Instead of facing his demons, Wilson becomes addicted to sniffing gasoline. Kathy Bates co-stars as Liza's mother.

 

Pete Seeger

May 3, 1919 - January 27, 2014

 

Pete Seeger the Power of Song (DVD)
The reflective documentary Pete Seeger: The Power of Song explores the legacy of revered American folk singer and activist Seeger - written and directed by filmmaker Jim Brown when Seeger was in his late '80s. In lieu of recounting the narrative of Seeger's life note-for-note, however, Brown uses that individual biography as a contextual lens, through which he recounts decades of American social history. To tell his story, the filmmaker interpolates original, exclusive interviews with such Seeger contemporaries as Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen, archival footage of Seeger in concert, and extracts from Seeger's private home movies. In the process, Brown unveils the extent to which Seeger continually prompted societal change through his consciousness-raising music and offstage social efforts.

 

 

 

 

 

Pete Seeger's Storytelling Book by Pete Seeger (2000)
Pete Seeger brings more than fifty years of performing folksongs to the art of storytelling in this unique collection of tales, ideas, and music. He and Paul Jacobs have put together fresh versions of familiar tales; stories based on songs, family histories, and America's past; as well as entirely new tales created just for this book. Each section describes the origins of the stories and there are suggestions for retelling and personalizing the tales to turn them into family favorites for bedtime or family time. And in keeping with the theme that a story never really ends-in fact gets better and better each time it is told.

 

 

How can I keep from singing : The Ballad of Pete Seeger by: David King Dunaway (2008)
"How Can I Keep from Singing? is the story of how the son of a respectable Puritan family became a consummate performer and American rebel. Updated with new research and interviews, unpublished photographs, and thoughtful comments from Pete Seeger himself, this is an inside history of the man Carl Sandburg called "Americas Tuning Fork."

 

The Protest Singer: An Intimate Portrait of Pete Seeger by Alec Wilkinson (2009)
A true American original is brought to life in this rich and lively portrait of Pete Seeger, who, with his musical grace and inextinguishable passion for social justice, transformed folk singing into a high form of peaceful protest in the second half of the twentieth century.

 

 

How to Play the 5-String Banjo : A Manual for Beginners
by Pete Seeger (2004) This basic manual for banjo players includes melody line, lyrics and banjo accompaniment and solos notated in standard form and tablature. Chapters cover material such as: a basic strum, the fifth string, hammering on, pulling off, double thumbing, and much more.

 

 

Abiyoyo by Pete Seeger (2001)
Banished from the town for making mischief, a little boy and his father are welcomed back when they find a way to make the dreaded giant Abiyoyo disappear.

 

One Grain of Sand by Pete Seeger (2002)
A lullaby celebrating the fragility of the environment, the innocence of childhood, and the sense that we all are connected and part of the world's family.

 

 

 

 

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